Permanent Exhibition

Hawikku: Echoes from the Past

Hawikku Exhibit

Hawikku Exhibit

The Hawikku exhibit installed in 2002 is comprised of 221 representative Hawikku pieces selected by Zuni representatives from the Hawikku collection at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C.  Hawikku is one of our most important ancestral villages because it was there that the A:shiwi first made contact with Europeans.


Hawikku Exhibit

Hawikku Exhibit

The exhibit describes Hawikku as it was before the Spanish invasion and during the period of Spanish influence, the Pueblo revolt, the change experienced in Zuni during the 1700s through the 1800s, the arrival of anthropologists and ethnographers to the Pueblo, and the controversial excavation of Hawikku conducted by the Hendricks-Hodge Expedition from 1918 to 1923.

As part of the exhibition you will be able to view a selection of silent films depicting traditional Zuni life ways. These films – now part of the AAMHC archives – were made in 1923 at Zuni by filmmaker Owen Cattell under the direction of Frederick W. Hodge and the Gustav Heye Museum of the American Indian.